Monthly Archives: June 2016

Hellenic Embodied Honour (Pride month Entry #4)

Muscle and definition were  not only beautiful to the eye but also reflected on the moral character of the person. Respectability  took on several dimensions for all men in ancient Greece. The interior life – emotions, ideas, religious positions – and their reflection through the body combined to form an elaborate understanding of honor.  Shame, by extension, […]

Read More

Achilles and Patroclus: Love, Pride and Honor (Pride Month #3)

It’s a question that has been asked thousands of times over the centuries: were they  lovers or not?   Or, just really good friends. The two heroes of the Trojan War are depicted in the Illiad as sharing a deep bond. Theirs was an unprecedented mythologised  account of a deeply emotional adult male relationship in ancient […]

Read More

Feminisation & Shame in Ancient Greece (Pride Month Entry 2)

  In ancient Greece, shame did not consist in merely engaging in same-sex love and sexuality. It lied in being feminised. It was the fact of being made a woman that was perceived to bring dishonour. Roisman’s (2011) « Ancient Greece from Homer to Alexander: The Evidence « comments on this link between feminisation and shame . […]

Read More

Intro: Pride v Shame in the Archaic Hellenic World (Pride month Entry 1)

  This blog will be peppered with scattered thoughts on the notions of pride and shame over this LGBT  Pride month of June. It will explore these as they relate to same-sex love and sexuality between men: In recent decades the gay liberation movement, which began in the US and was adapted on the other side of […]

Read More